News, announcements, updates, and happenings in the UVA Library

Announcing the 2024 Research Sprints program

By UVA Library | Tue, 05/21/2024 - 10:40

UVA Library is pleased to announce its 2024 Research Sprints program. Research Sprints provide faculty with the opportunity to partner with a team of expert librarians on a specific project, offering deep interaction and an extended time commitment. During the sprints, faculty work intensively with librarians for one to three full working days to overcome obstacles, explore new research avenues, or test new methods. The 2024 Research Sprints program will be dedicated to the following projects:                                                                                                                                 

Kiera Allison (School of Commerce) and Spyridon Simotas (French, College of Arts & Sciences): “Virtual Dialogic Writing Center”

The Sprint will support Professors Allison and Simotas in developing an AI-powered writing interface that aims to democratize access to high-quality, personalized writing support. Unlike current AI writing assistants that prioritize speed and ease, this platform re-engages students in the critical processes of writing through interactive dialogue centered on generating ideas, identifying errors, and developing a distinct authorial voice. By simulating the experience of conversing with a knowledgeable writing mentor, this virtual writing center scaffolds the development of essential communication skills, bridges gaps in teacher availability, and empowers students of all backgrounds to cultivate their inner editor and confidently approach real-life conversations about writing.

Library team: 

  • Ronda Grizzle, Project Management and Training Specialist (lead)
  • Jeremy Boggs, Head of Research and Development
  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English
  • Doug Chestnut, Lead User Experience Web Developer
  • Shane Lin, Senior Developer

Coleen Carrigan (Engineering and Society, School of Engineering): “Magic, Traffic and Autocratic Futures: Computers and the Gendered Economy”

The focus of this Sprint is to work on a monograph, “Magic, Traffic and Autocratic Futures: Computers and the Gendered Economy,” a critical ethnography to advance knowledge on epistemic, social, and allocational justice in computer science and engineering. The considerable gap between popular discourses glorifying computer technology and the actual impacts of computing on society requires further attention. This book addresses this pressing need and critically examines the structural inequalities in STEM education and the tech industry through an intersection of gender, race and labor analyses. “Magic, Traffic and Autocratic Futures” provides innovative pathways for justice in STEM worksites and equitable access to knowledge production in computing.

Library team:

  • Christine Slaughter, Social Sciences Research Librarian (lead)
  • Maggie Nunley, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities
  • Kristal Sergent, Associate Librarian for African-American and African Studies

Steph Ceraso (English, College and Arts & Sciences): Sound in Relation: Toward a Bodily, Multisensory Approach to Invention”

This Sprint will support research related to a new book project, “Sound in Relation: Toward a Bodily, Multisensory Approach to Invention.” This project aims to reimagine how invention is understood in writing studies — as more than an abstract process grounded in logic and ideas — through an exploration of sonic invention practices in a range of disciplines. The book seeks to expand theoretical and pedagogical frameworks to enrich our knowledge of the invention process for composing digital and multimedia texts. The library team will be identifying and gathering sources to help create bibliographies around key terms for the book.

Library team:

  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English (lead)
  • Amy Hunsaker, Librarian for Music & the Performing Arts
  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities
  • Steven Villereal, Audiovisual Conservator

Gerard Fitzgerald (Engineering and Society, School of Engineering): “The Nature of War: An Environmental History of Industrialization in the United States During World War I, 1898-1929” 

This research project will explore the environmental impact of the U.S. industrial and agricultural growth from the Spanish-American War to World War I. This study, in collaboration with the UVA Library Staff, will analyze historical journals from 1900-1925 to understand shifts in conservation and resource management during wartime. The project aims to deepen our understanding of the complex relationship that nature and the environment can play in the process of industrialization and military mobilization during global war.

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History and Religious Studies (lead)
  • Scott Ackerman, Associate Director for Organizational Culture, Learning, and Outreach
  • Rachel Cressell, Graduate Student, Arts & Sciences
  • Maggie Nunley, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Erich Purpur, Science and Engineering Research Librarian

Andrew Johnston (Architectural History, School of Architecture): “Giancarlo De Carlo, Built Heritage, and Participatory Design”

This Sprint will focus on a book project based on the Italian architect Giancarlo De Carlo, drawing from De Carlo’s lectures and seminars during his tenure at the University of California, Berkeley, where Johnston served as his assistant. Now collaborating with Professor Simona Salvo from Sapienza University in Rome, the project includes digitizing original recordings and transcripts for use in a new seminar course on participatory design. Alongside developing the course, Johnston and Salvo are focused on revising a grant proposal for the Graham Foundation to support the book’s publication. The Sprint project combines archival research, seminar teaching, discussions on copyright, and explorations into AI research tools, all aiming to enrich architectural education and scholarship through a contemporary analysis of De Carlo’s work.

Library team:

  • Rebecca Coleman, Librarian for Architecture (lead)
  • Brandon Butler, Former Director of Information Policy
  • David Hennigan, Grants and Contracts Administrator
  • Miguel Valladares-Llata, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American Studies

Pallavi Rao (Media Studies, College of Arts & Sciences): “Mapping Caste in the Indian Media Industries”

This digital humanities project involves creating a social network graph of media ownership to examine its ties to broader domains of power, such as business, politics, and education. By utilizing a prosopographic approach, this research examines biographical data of high-ranking media executives, including caste, educational backgrounds, and institutional affiliations, to explore how these factors influence India’s media oligopolies and the consolidation of various media sectors. Aimed at revealing the dominance of upper-caste elites in media ownership and their impact on content production, this study develops a broader theory and framework to connect caste and capitalism with class formation among the elites using India’s media industries as a site of exploration.

Library team:

  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities (lead)
  • Dimitri Kastritsis, Associate Librarian for Global Studies and Development
  • Jenn Huck, Associate Director, Research Data Services & Social, Natural, and Engineering Sciences
  • With consultation with members of the Scholars’ Lab

David Singerman (History, College of Arts and Sciences): “New Histories of Doping in Sports”

This Sprint will advance a project on new histories of doping in sports, which asks questions that move beyond a moralistic framework of clean heroes and dirty villains. Why are certain substances banned, but not others? Who uses these drugs, where do they get them, and how do users learn what to do? How do actors balance knowledge from the laboratory with the evidence from performances on the field? Singerman and the library Sprint team will focus on laboratory and clinical research about performance-enhancing drugs (specifically EPO, human growth hormone, and steroids). Researchers face an inherent tension: the more they investigate the average physiology’s reactions to doping products, the less they can extrapolate to the extraordinary physiology of elite athletes. The goals of this sprint are to (1) assemble a comprehensive library of the scientific research on these drugs in sports, and (2) learn new tools and methods to analyze this body of research.

Library team:

  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History and Religious Studies (lead)
  • Jeremy Boggs, Head of Research and Development for the Scholars Lab
  • Jenn Huck, Associate Director, Research Data Services & Social, Natural, and Engineering Sciences
  • Andrea Denton, Research and Data Services Manager, Health Sciences Library

 

Congratulations to recipients of Course Enrichment Grants 2024-25!

By UVA Library | Fri, 05/10/2024 - 14:19

The Library is pleased to announce that the following projects have been selected for support in the Course Enrichment Grants program. These grants provide support to faculty interested in enhancing students’ abilities to seek, evaluate, manage, and use information and data in scholarly contexts, as well as create media-rich class assignments. Faculty recipients work with teams of library staff to revise their syllabi and plan for in-class instructional support.

Ira Bashkow (Anthropology, College of Arts & Sciences)

In this innovative approach for improving research competency in a large class of 180+ students, this introductory anthropology course, “The Concept of Culture,” involves students interviewing a family elder, documenting their stories, and then exploring how the elder’s life was shaped by broader historical and cultural contexts. With many students unaware of effective research techniques, this course will scaffold their research process by constructing generalizable “research pathways,” which will help students engage with personally relevant scholarly writing using library resources. Thus, the project will develop simplified aids to navigating library resources, while giving the research process a personal motivation by connecting it to an experience of deepening the student’s understanding of their own heritage and family history.

Team:

  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities
  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History and Religious Studies
  • Chris Ruotolo, Director, Research in the Arts and Humanities
  • Jean Cooper, Principal Cataloger (and genealogy expert)
  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian 

Matthew Chin (Women, Gender and Sexuality; College of Arts & Sciences)

This new course focuses on conducting historical research grounded in decolonial, anti-racist feminist, and queer perspectives, designed to meet UVA’s writing requirement. Throughout the semester, students acquire skills including crafting research questions, locating pertinent sources, applying appropriate theoretical frameworks, and presenting findings to various audiences. Assignments progressively build upon each other, allowing room for continuous improvement via constructive feedback. Upon completion, students master valuable research and communication skills, while promoting awareness of social justice issues among academic and general communities. Professor Chin will use this opportunity to sharpen his skills in curriculum design, assignment creation, and providing targeted guidance to improving students’ writing skills.

Team:

  • Cecelia Parks, Undergraduate Student Success Librarian
  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities
  • Jacob Hopkins, Instruction Librarian/Archivist
  • Grace Hale, Instruction Librarian, Special Collections
  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian

Stephan De Wekker (Environmental Sciences, College of Arts & Sciences)

This course will integrate generative artificial intelligence tools into the environmental sciences department’s “Mountain Meteorology” course to assist students in understanding complex meteorological concepts and analyzing data sets. Using AI tools has the power to make learning more efficient, interactive, and equitable. It will also help Professor De Wekker dedicate more class time to discussing case studies, research, and group activities instead of focusing solely on foundational explanations. Through “peer reviews” of each other’s interactions with AI tools, students will gain greater competency in leveraging this new technology to enhance their learning.

Team:

  • Erich Purpur, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Doug Chestnut, Lead User Experience Web Developer
  • Maggie Nunley, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian 

Ying Gao (East Asian Language, Literature, and Culture; College of Arts & Sciences )

In the CHIN 1060 and CHIN2060 courses tailored for heritage Chinese language learners, a community-based project called “Windows of Shanghai” is being expanded into a long-term initiative in collaboration with the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library. Students will create useful community resources, including bilingual tutorial videos, book directories, and story sessions. This project aims to improve students’ research skills and language proficiency, develop cultural understanding, and promote a sense of community responsibility. By nurturing stronger ties between the University and the local community, this initiative can continue to positively influence future classes, fostering a lasting relationship with local libraries and families.

Team:

  • Wei Wang, Librarian for East Asian Studies
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Ashley Hosbach-Wallman, Education and Social Science Librarian
  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian

Adrienne Ghaly (English, College of Arts & Sciences)

In fall 2024, “ENGL 2599: Literatures of the Nonhuman” will focus on deep integration of generative artificial intelligence into the core elements of literary analysis. Following encouraging feedback from previous experiments, we plan to develop effective multimodal assignments using AI to help students develop strong close reading skills, produce literary critical analyses, and engage meaningfully in cultural critique. While the course’s content focuses on literary intersections of the human and the nonhuman, the impact of exploring AI for literary analysis would be widespread and positive, from providing students legitimate and scholarly approaches to the technology, to creating working models for faculty to adopt in their own classes in ways that further the shared outcomes of English literature courses.

Team:

  • Sherri Brown, Librarian for English
  • Josh Thorud, Multimedia Teaching and Learning Librarian
  • Erin Pappas, Librarian for the Humanities
  • Shane Lin, Senior Developer, Scholars’ Lab
  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian

Diana Morris (Applied Mathematics, School of Engineering)

This course in applied mathematics will introduce a new module focused on the use of UVA Library services and collections for finding and assessing data sets. Students will practice locating reliable datasets, describe their origins and limitations, and evaluate their quality and suitability for certain techniques. Addressing broader needs in statistics education, this knowledge will be foundational to successful research in many fields and has the potential to influence instruction in other data-based courses.

Team:

  • Maggie Nunley, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Erich Purpur, Science and Engineering Research Librarian
  • Jenn Huck, Associate Director, Research Data Services & Social, Natural, and Engineering Science
  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian

Lisa Shutt (African American and African Studies, College of Arts & Sciences)

This upper-level undergraduate seminar will focus on the historic River View Farm in Albemarle County, formerly owned by the Carr/Greer family for over a century. The course aims to enhance students’ research skills, especially when working with primary sources from UVA’s Special Collections Library and other repositories. Professor Shutt also hopes to create an open educational resource where students’ research papers contribute chapters to a comprehensive source on River View Farm and the Carr/Greer family. By partnering with the Ivy Creek Foundation, this course will promote undergraduate education in the service of community outreach and the preservation of local Black histories.

Team:

  • Bethany Mickel, Instructional Design and OER Librarian
  • Keith Weimer, Librarian for History and Religious Studies
  • Kristal Sergent, Associate Librarian for African American and African Studies
  • Jacob Hopkins, Instructional Librarian and Archivist
  • Grace Hale, Reference Librarian, Special Collections

Deep dive: The history of Jewish Americans in Virginia

By UVA Library | Tue, 05/07/2024 - 09:25

May marks the celebration of Jewish American Heritage Month, a commemoration established by both the Federal Government and the state of Virginia. This year, UVA Library’s Rose Oliveira-Abbey and Carla Arton delved into the rich local history of Jewish Americans in Virginia, a legacy dating back to 1585. While Jewish communities have been established throughout the state, our resources primarily highlight the vibrant narratives from Northern Virginia, Richmond, Charlottesville, and Southeast Virginia. This exploration is presented through three distinct reader experiences: to discover in print, online, or in person.

Throughout these narratives, recurring themes emerge, including the values of charity and justice (tzedakah), community service (tikkun olam, or repairing the world), a dedication to education and historical preservation, experiences of antisemitism and immigration, the challenges of assimilation, and the enduring efforts to build and sustain community and culture. Central to this local history is the acknowledgment that these achievements owe much to foundational principles of Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Statue for Religious Freedom and the protection afforded by the United States’ First Amendment. For those interested in a broader perspective, scroll to the bottom for a list of documentaries that illuminate the wider Jewish American experience.

Discover in print

Charlottesville

Book cover of "Saving Monticello: The Levy Family’s Epic Quest to Rescue the House that Jefferson Built" shows a black-and-white photo of a classical building with a small dome (Monticello) looking dilapidated.Saving Monticello: The Levy Family’s Epic Quest to Rescue the House that Jefferson Built” by Mark Leepson (UVA Press, 2003)

The author follows the efforts of the Levy family across generations to preserve Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello, which was on a path to being lost to time. This story reflects Jewish American values and themes around service and national pride, education and historical preservation, and struggles with assimilation and antisemitism.

Black-and-white, 19th-century profile photo of a bald white man with a long white beard wearing a dark suit.
James Joseph Sylvester (Public Domain)

America’s First Jewish Professor: James Joseph Sylvester at the University of Virginia” by Lewis S. Feuer (American Jewish Archives, 1984)

This journal article, held in Special Collections (or scanned here), tries to set the record straight about the first secular Jewish professor appointed in the United States in 1841. A British mathematician, Sylvester was invited to teach at UVA and experienced a mixture of excitement and disapproval over his appointment. His tenure was short-lived at only four months, when an altercation with a troublesome student prompted him to resign. He went on to teach at other great institutions, ending up as the Savilian Chair of Geometry at Oxford University. Incidentally, UVA didn’t hire another Jewish faculty member for another 80 years, when they hired two during the 1920s.

A Brief History of the Jewish Community in Charlottesville and Albemarle” (Special publication, 1982)

This is short centennial publication by Congregation Beth Israel, celebrating the Jewish community’s establishment and history in Charlottesville.

Richmond

The Center: From Generation to Generation” (Dementi Milestone Publishing, 2017)

This publication from the Carol and Marcus Weinstein Jewish Community Center in Richmond, Virginia, celebrates their first 70 years. It highlights various building and programming expansions and each generation’s impact on the local community through their dedication to responsibility, inclusion (they were the only non-segregated health facility in Richmond), education and excellence. They’ve grown to provide a year-round preschool with inclusion services for 40% of students; summer camps; health and fitness classes; a theater & arts program; and multiple charity opportunities, such as the donations to the local food pantry.

Richmond’s Jewry, 1769-1976: Shabbat in Shockoe” by Myron Berman (UVA Press, 1979)

An historical publication by the University of Virginia Press and the Jewish Community Federation of Richmond in 1979 on the Jewish communities of Richmond, Virginia, between 1769 and 1976.

Northern Virginia

Jewish Communities of Northern Virginia” by Susan Dilles and Shawn Dilles (Arcadia Publishing, 2022)

Published as part of the “Images of America” series, this book follows 175 years of Jewish communities forming and fluctuating in Northern Virginia, starting in the 1850s. It discusses daily life; faith-based practices and synagogues; the various industries that Jews worked in, including contributions to the federal government; waves of immigration; and how the some of the families resettled further into Virginia over time.

Suffolk

Book cover for "The Color of Water" shows a black-and-white photo white woman with two mixed-race children, a boy and a girl, cira 1940s. The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother” by James McBride (Riverhead Books, 1996)

This powerful memoir tells the story of James McBride and his mother, Ruth McBride Jordan, born Rachel Shilsky. The narrative bounces between two viewpoints: one of James, who tells the story of his childhood, growing up as one of twelve siblings in a mixed-race family in New York City. The other is of Ruth, whose past she only reluctantly shares with her son as an adult. She talks about her life as a Jewish immigrant in Suffolk, Virginia, where her family settled in the 1930s. She describes The antisemitism she faced, and the suffocating household presided over by her father, an itinerant Orthodox Rabbi, who was abusive and racist. It traces her move to New York, falling in love with Andrew McBride, a Black man, and the schism that created in her family. The book is a meditation on race, identity, love, and what family means.

Virginia

Chapters on the Jews of Virginia - Chapters on the Jews of Virginia, 1658-1900” by Louis Ginsberg (1969)

Published in 1969 by Cavalier Press in Richmond, this book gives a wide history of the various Jewish communities within Virginia, covering from 1668 to 1900. 

Discover online

Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities – Virginia

Created by Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL), this website has an interactive of Jewish communities in the South. The interactive map allows you to explore different communities throughout Virginia, providing historical overviews, stories of Jewish life, and the state of the Jewish communities today. A fantastic way to learn about the many communities located all around the state.

Virginia Chronicle – Library of Virginia

An excellent primary source database offered by the Library of Virginia of historical newspapers from across the state and nation.

Jewish South – 1893-1899

A weekly newspaper published in from 1893 to 1899, it was “a journal devoted to the interests of Judaism,” that covered Richmond also neighboring counties. It reported on local news in congregations, lodges, and societies as well as published sermons, essays, and articles explaining, discussing or commenting on the lessons and doctrines of Judaism. It is a fascinating peek into Jewish life in Virginia at the end of the 19th century.

Virginia-Carolina Jewish Messenger – 1933-1938

The tagline reads “The only Anglo-Jewish newspaper published in Virginia and the Carolinas.” While it ceased publication in 1938, it provides an interesting glimpse into both local Jewish life in the South as well as documenting the rise and impact of Nazism and an increase in Zionism as a result.

To Seek the Peace of the City: Jewish Life in Charlottesville

A fantastic online exhibit from the early 2000s, created in collaboration of the Jewish Arts and Culture Taskforce of the Hillel Jewish Center at the University of Virginia, in partnership with Congregation Beth Israel of Charlottesville and the Albemarle County Historical Society. The website explores Jewish life in Charlottesville from its very first Jewish settlers in Albemarle County in 1757 up to the middle of the 20th century.  It provides a detailed look at the development of Jewish life in Charlottesville, as well as the student and faculty experience at UVA.

Discover in person

Downtown Charlottesville Jewish History Walking Tour – Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society

The Historical Society will offer two tours this spring (May 9 & June 9) with UVA Professor Emerita Phyllis Leffler, who co-published the UVA online exhibit listed above and was the recent President of the Southern Jewish Historical Society. Walk the Downtown Mall and learn about the local Jewish community and what has been happening since the 2001 exhibit was published.

Virginia Holocaust Museum – Richmond

The VHM highlights stories from the Holocaust and personal stories of survivors who fled to Virginia to escape the Nazis. As part of their permanent exhibits, they feature the “Jewish American Hall of Fame,” highlighting over 50 Jewish Americans and the contributions they made to humanity. They also have an online collection of oral histories, biographies of Survivors in Virginia, and a virtual tour of the museum. 

Congregation Beth Ahabah – Museums & Archives – Richmond

A drawing of a gray temple with a dome and columns out front.
The current building for Congregation Beth Ahabah, built 1904, styled after Monticello and the UVA Rotunda.

This is the oldest Jewish community in Richmond, and one of the oldest communities in the United States, originally starting in 1789 as a Sephardic orthodox synagogue (Kahal Kadosh Beth Shalome) and later combining with an Ashkenazi Reform temple in the late 1800s (Congregation Beth Ahabah). It is a beautiful building in downtown Richmond, near Virginia Commonwealth University, with Tiffany Studios stained-glass windows and a museum attached. The museum currently has four exhibits you can visit (see bulleted list below). Congregants of Beth Ahabah have long been part of the wider Richmond community, involved in the women’s voting rights movement, the local school board, and various social services. In 1871, it offered to dismantle its own school program so the city could use its rooms as the location of the first public school in Richmond. 

  • “Chai Lights” – 18 stories highlighting the Jewish experience in Richmond.
  • “Beyond the Temple Walls: A Commitment to Community” – Highlights the longstanding commitment of the Richmond Jewish Community to service and charity (tzedakah) over two centuries, as part of the Jewish obligation to “Repair the World” or carry out Tikkun Olam.
  • “Commonwealth and Community: The Jewish Experience in Virginia” - This exhibit pairs with the book of the same title and covers from the first Jew to accompany Sir Walter Raleigh on his expeditions in Virginia, metallurgist Joachim Gans, to the founding of the State of Israel and its impact on Richmond Jews.
  • “Count Me In! Richmond’s Jews Respond to WWI” – This exhibit commemorates the 234 Jewish men that served in World War I from Richmond, how they served, and how the Jewish community at home supported the war.

Jewish Museum and Cultural Center – Portsmouth, Virginia – Hampton Roads and Tidewater Communities

Next time you’re in the Tidewater area, check out this museum connected to Chevra Thelim Synagogue, once a thriving orthodox community. It highlights the stories of Jewish immigrants during World War II to the area, and how they lived as refugees and naturalized American citizens. The building and museum are now registered on the National Trust for Historic Preservation and is on the Virginia Historic Register.

Documentaries on the broader Jewish American experience

Below are some great PBS broadcast documentaries highlighting some of the themes we mentioned above but from a broader national experience. All are freely available through the Shannon Library.

The Jewish Journey: America (2018, PBS)

Follows personal stories of Jewish Americans from early immigrants & settlers, up until the 21st century.

The Jewish Americans (2008, PBS, DVD)

The US and the Holocaust (2022, PBS)

GI Jews (2018, PBS)

GI Jews: Jewish Americans in World War II tells the story of the 550,000 Jewish Americans who fought in World War II. In their own words, veterans both famous and unknown bring their war experiences to life.

Jews of the Wild West (2022, Electric Yolk Media)

Explores Jewish Americans’ positive impact and contributions in shaping the American Western states. To illuminate the history it highlights specific stories, like those of Levi Strauss and Josephine Marcus, the wife of Wyatt Earp, and personal stories of contemporary Jewish Americans.

Looking for more? Go to The Jewish American Heritage Month website.

4 Books to honor Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May

By Molly Minturn | Fri, 04/26/2024 - 15:10

May is Asian / Pacific Islander / South Asian American Heritage Month, making it a great time to feature materials created by, for, and about Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Join the Library in celebrating this heritage month and take a look at our librarians’ recommendations below!

The East Indian” by Brinda Charry (Scribner 2023)

A book cover with an illustration of poppies in the foreground and a ship in the background.A 1635 Virginia land record indicates the presence of “Tony East Indian.” No other details are known about this individual, but Brinda Charry seeks to recreate his life in this creative and historically faithful 2023 novel. She imagines Tony as a native of Madras, brought as an indentured servant first to London (where he is baptized and takes a Christian name), and then Virginia. Tony notes his outsider status in a society composed largely of Black and White (Native Americans remain a shadowy presence on the margins of the colony), but he skillfully navigates personal relationships and the nuances of race and class. An interesting perspective on Virginia at a time when racial categories were emerging but had not yet hardened into a system of perpetual lifetime bondage.  

Keith Weimer

Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning” by Cathy Hong (One World, 2020)

Book cover with the words "Minor Feelings" made to look as though they are on fire.In a 2020 series of evocative intersectional essays, memoirist Cathy Park Hong contextualizes contemporary anti-Asian racism and racialized consciousness in America. From the origins of the 1917 Asian immigration ban and enforced racial segregation to the Korean War through to her own experiences as a child in California, a student in the Midwest and a published poet flown across America to read to white audiences, Hong acknowledges the complexities of experiences Asian Americans face. “Minor feelings are also the emotions we are accused of having,” Hong writes, “when we decide to be difficult — in other words, when we decide to be honest.” Hong uses her own stories to poetically explore the contradictory ways in which racial identity is trivialized, even by herself at times, as “minor and non-urgent,” displayed overtly and internalized, resisted and accepted.

 – Meg Kennedy

Babel: Or the Necessity of Violence: An Arcane History of the Oxford Translators' Revolution” by R.F. Kuang (Harper Voyager, 2022)

Book cover for "Babel" features black-and-white illustration of a tower within a gothic-looking city at dusk. The tower is surrounded by white birds. Words are magic, as we in libraries know, but they are especially so in Kuang’s 2022 novel. Eager student Robin Swift stumbles through truth and fiction at Oxford University (real, of course) and its Royal Institute of Translation (not real, of course) as he learns how to enchant translated language through a process called silver-working. His scholarship reveals identities, including his own, and leads him to discover the insidious nature of the Institute’s ensorcelled words. Babel is speculative historical fiction offering a somewhat grim but captivating commentary on the way academia has perpetuated colonialism. It’s also an analysis of friendship tested by both extraordinary events and the mundane stressors of being a student. Kuang, author of the fascinating, tenebrous “Poppy War” trilogy, again spellbinds the reader.

Leigh Rockey

Kitchen” by Banana Yoshimoto (Washington Square Press, 1993)

Book cover for "Kitchen" features a photo/collage of an Asian woman in a white dress standing in front of a giant, overturned red bowl. Yoshimoto is a prolific Japanese author who rose to international fame with the 1993 translation of her award-winning 1988 novel. Similar in tone to Yoshimoto’s other novels, “Kitchen” is an engrossing, ethereal story exploring grief, routine, family, tradition, gender identity, food, and more seemingly divergent topics. In “Kitchen,” everyone is a philosopher, reflecting on their choices, surroundings, and inner dialogue. Yoshimoto’s presentation of trans characters reflects the prejudices of the protagonists, while the narration always uses correct pronouns. This tension reflects the relationship development through the novel; the close tracking and examination of interpersonal moments is characteristic of Yoshimoto’s work. While only thirteen of her novels have been translated into English, new translations are coming out regularly: we’ve been treated to a Yoshimoto translation in both 2022 and 2023.

 – Mandy Rizki

“For the Common Good” — Collective bargaining sees new life in Library exhibition

By UVA Library | Thu, 04/25/2024 - 09:44

Collective Bargaining for the Common Good: Two decades of labor unions at the university and in CharlottesvilleWhen first-year students signed up for Piers Gelly’s course to fulfill their required ENWR class credits for fall 2023, they had no idea that they’d soon become the only group of first-year students to curate an exhibition at UVA Library.

The exhibition, “Collective Bargaining for the Common Good,” runs through June 20 in the First Floor Gallery of the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. The exhibition amplifies 22 years of labor advocacy at UVA and in the Charlottesville area, ongoing through this day.

Collective Bargaining remains an engaging topic in Virginia — one of only three states where, until 2021, a state-wide ban (instituted as segregationist policy at UVA in the 1940s) prohibited collective bargaining by public-sector unions. Gelly, who floated the exhibition as an optional project at the end of required coursework, said: “Ive just been so proud of these students the whole time. I don't take it for granted that they didn't really choose to be in my class; they just ended up there by virtue of where they fall in the alphabet, and when their schedule was open. So for them to take a chance … and follow a project like this, not only through this semester, but then to sign on to the exhibition after this semester — I have so much admiration for them.”

Gelly’s class, ENWR 1510: Writing About Labor, is one of many writing and rhetoric classes offered to first-year students under broad umbrellas like “Writing About Nature” or “Writing About Society,” where they learn to research and write at a college level. Librarians Jacob Hopkins, Cecelia Parks, and Sherri Brown assisted in the classroom as Gelly’s students learned how to request and analyze Special Collections materials and Library holdings like archival newspapers and microfilm collections.

“Within the context of the class, the final project was to create a trifold poster board, so sort of science fair vibes,” Gelly said. Students worked with Library curator Holly Robertson to learn the basics of presenting archival materials, including concise exhibition writing and visual design considerations.

But Gelly saved a surprise for the end: “All of the students finished up this semester, having created a DIY museum — and they didn't know until the last day of class that there was going to be an actual Special Collections exhibition. I was very strategic in when I gave  them information, so that they weren't overwhelmed.” When Gelly told his students about the plan for a formal exhibition, eight students chose to sign on. With support from the Library’s Wolfe Fellowship — funded by Mary Lacey Long Wolfe (Col ‘88), a former Library student assistant, to support student docent and curatorial work in Library exhibitions — a cohort of eight students divided into four groups to work with primary source materials as well as local community advisors who are current or former members of labor unions at UVA or in Charlottesville.

Student curators Drew Dillman and Kim Egoavil partnered with community members from Charlottesville Area Transit (CAT) as they recently joined the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU); Samantha Bragg and Elizabeth Campbell worked with current and former staff leaders to chronicle the Staff Union at UVA (SUUVA); Hank Hawkins and Pearl Kluger searched the country to locate former UVA graduate students and document the activism of the Graduate Labor Union (GLU); and Katherine Jennings and Karen Guzman researched the recent formation of the UVA chapter of United Campus Workers of Virginia.

Gelly’s work on this exhibition is also supported by an Open Education Resources (OER) Affordability and Equity Grant administered by the UVA Library. Given the significant presence of Special Collections materials in Gelly’s proposed OER project, Library Director of Faculty Programs Judy Thomas recommended that they begin a conversation with Library curation teams about a potential exhibition. Gelly’s OER project will culminate not only in this ambitious, student-curated exhibition, but also in the creation of an OER resource in the form of a catalog that captures the research and curation on the history of labor organizing and collective bargaining at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville.

The student curators were driven by the power of the primary source material and the compelling stories of their community advisors. Pearl Kluger said, “I think if theres one thing visitors should take away, its the passion behind labor unions, because every single person, every single former member of Graduate Labor Union that we spoke to was so passionate about their experience. … I hope that our exhibition carries the passion behind this movement.”

While students learned to conduct advanced research, using tools like microfilm to comb archival records, they also sought out relevant contemporary experiences such as attending a Charlottesville City Council meeting. In the meeting, members of the Amalgamated Transit Union, which covers Charlottesville bus drivers, advocated for fairer terms in their first-ever collectively bargained contract. This was only possible due to an ordinance passed in 2022 to allow collective bargaining for Charlottesville City employees.

Drew Dillman reflected on the living history in the exhibition: “Its centered on the people involved. We got to meet these people, the actual people involved, and they are the heart and soul of this exhibition.”

“Collective Bargaining for the Common Good,” on view until June 20, conveys a riveting picture of that history and the labor movement — its past, its present, and perhaps even its future.

On Friday, April 26, Gelly and his students will present a gallery talk on the exhibition during a Special Collections Final Friday event. Visitors can also enjoy Kona Ice and screenprint “Collective Bargaining for the Common Good” T-shirts with local artist Thomas Dean. The event runs from 5:30-7 p.m. in the Small Special Collections Library, located at 170 McCormick Road.

“Collective Bargaining for the Common Good” is located on the ground floor of the Harrison/Small building, outside the entrance to the Special Collections reading room. (Photos by Tom Daly)
A photo of the exhibition case showing a transit worker vest, photo of the union, and information about their recent organizing.
The exhibition covers historic labor organizing as well as ongoing work, such as with the recent passage of collective bargaining rights for Charlottesville transit workers and on-Grounds advocacy from the United Campus Workers.
A front view of an exhibition case shows memorabilia, flyers, and protest signs related to labor organizing.
Over the years, the Charlottesville area has seen a variety of organizing efforts. The prohibition on collective bargaining in 1946 has led to labor movements being more creative in their methods as they seek to advocate for collective benefit.

 

April is Arab American Heritage Month! Enjoy these recommendations of books and films by Arab American women.

By UVA Library | Wed, 04/10/2024 - 10:34

This April, the UVA Library honors National Arab American Heritage Month with selections of books and films by Arab American women. Leigh Rockey, Librarian for Collections Management and Video Resources, recommends the following titles.

Books

Sajjilu Arab American: A Reader in SWANA StudiesSajjilu Arab American: A Reader in SWANA Studies,” edited by Louise Cainkar, Pauline Homsi Vinson, and Amira Jarmakani, published by Syracuse University Press (2022), offers curated, contextualized essays outlining the history and possible futures of scholarship regarding Arab peoples in the Americas. There is no definition of what Arab American studies and/or Southwest Asian/North African studies mean, and this collection of works, both foundational and speculative, wants to stretch beyond such questions. The (R)eader moves through six approaches to the examination of Arab American bodies, arts, literatures, representations, movements, and more. We learn about interpretations of Arab-ness, the structures of race generating from and imposed on Arab American communities, intersections of belonging or exclusion, and ultimately, solidarities. Anyone looking to newly engage or reconstitute an understanding of Arab American studies would benefit from the many perspectives in this excellent primer.

Bride of the SeaThe following two works of fiction won the Arab American Book Award, given by the Arab American National Museum in Michigan in 2022 and 2023, respectively.

If a mother takes her daughter and keeps her away from the rest of her family for years, does the daughter have two lives — the one she knows in America and the one she is missing in Saudi Arabia? This question, or something like it, forms the center of Eman Quotah’s “Bride of the Sea.” Family drama is universal, but it's the specificity of the clash between Hannah/Hanadi's American and Saudi Arabian families that so deeply intrigues the reader of this book. Throughout, emotions peak when Hannah/Hanadi's own voice breaks through the narrative as she remembers that her mother “stole” her, how they hid behind curtains and fake names, and what happened when she in turn took herself away from her mother. What is the true course of her life, and will she ever find it? As her father says, God willing, you will be with the ones you love.

 

The Stardust ThiefThe Stardust Thief” by Chelsea Abdullah, the first book of a forthcoming trilogy, offers tales within tales for lovers of storytelling. The reader follows the Midnight Merchant and her companions through enchanted cities and seas of sand to locate a certain lamp containing a powerful jinn. If you think you've heard this before (a la One Thousand and One Nights), you'd be wrong. While the book draws on familiar Arabian folktales, its story is fresh and quickly paced. Twisted truths, both delightful and harrowing, impact the literal and mystical routes the characters follow. Everyone is not what they seem, and the author crafts the cloaked identities so well that the reader might want to consume the book in one sitting.

Films

“Jaddoland,” 2020

JaddolandFilmmaker Nadia Shihab's mother Lahib is Iraqi, lives in Lubbock, Texas, and she is an artist. These ingredients are all that's needed to make a fascinating documentary of a life communicated through art. What is often absent from the frame becomes the center of the film’s intentions. We see just the waving tale of a black cat, and we know that the cat is intrigued by something. We hear Shihab's grandfather respond to the question of whether he likes Texas with, "It is Texas," and we know that he longs for Iraq. Looking at the camera, Lahib tries to explain a painting while she works on it, but she eventually lets the art speak for itself, much as the film refrains from imposing meaning on every scene. At the end, we are surprised at Lahib's choices, and the portrait becomes obscured.

“The Feeling of Being Watched,” 2018

The Feeing of Being WatchedWe now know that the FBI launched Operation Vulgar Betrayal in the 1990s to investigate Muslim American residents of Bridgeview, Illinois, based on what seems to be little more than ethnic and religious profiling. Assia Boundaoui was a child in Bridgeview then, the daughter of Algerian parents, and her film tracks her own scrutiny of the FBI's intense surveillance of her hometown. She explains how such surveillance inculcates paranoia into an entire community and results in fear and willing subjugation of self. When she applies for information from the FBI under FOIA, she is denied. She wins a court case to have the documents of the operation released, and they reveal a sprawling, intense examination. It bears mentioning that no terrorism-related charges were ever filed against anyone involved. This film is a riveting examination of the outcome of the FBI's actions and Boundaoui's persistence in revealing the truth. We don’t know, though — is the government still watching?

‘Double Happiness’: Reception celebrating a new Shannon Library art installation set for April 12

By Molly Minturn | Tue, 04/09/2024 - 10:32

They are bright, eye-catching, inviting: eight colorful banners on the second floor of Shannon Library call out visitors with greetings and phrases in languages that represent the University’s Asian, Pacific Islander, and South Asian American (APISAA) community.

The art installation, titled “Double Happiness,” after a traditional Chinese ligature often used to symbolize marriage, was created by Amy Chan, an abstract painter and UVA Associate Professor of Studio Art. On April 12, the UVA community is invited to an art reception celebrating Chan’s installation, to be held in the study courts on the second floor of Shannon from 2 to 4 p.m. Remarks begin at 2:15 p.m. and light refreshments will be served.

Eight colorful banners hang in a lobby area of the library.
Amy Chan’s art installation, “Double Happiness,” is located on the second floor of Shannon Library. (All photos by Tom Daly)

For those who can’t visit the installation in person, the text on the banners reads, from left to right:

Ganbare, Japanese, to persevere
Double Happiness, Chinese, joy and unity
Hwaiting, Korean, you got this!
Padayon, Visayan dialect / Philippines, to carry on
Kya baat hai, Hindi, how amazing!
All places are ours and all people are our kin, Tamil
Andamu, Telugu, inner beauty
Sudah makan, Malaysian, have you eaten?

The initial idea for the work came from a group of APISAA undergraduate students who met with UVA Student Success Librarians Cecelia Parks and Haley Gillilan for weekly dinners during the fall 2022 semester. The purpose of those dinners was to give the students a place to discuss their experiences at UVA and to brainstorm ideas for how the Library could be more welcoming to their community. The installation will remain up through the Fall 2024 semester.

The students discussed how they would love to see more contemporary Asian or Asian American art in Library spaces,” said Parks. “They really liked the idea of a mural or another large-scale piece of public art in the renovated main library. … The end result is the beautiful display you see today,” Parks said.

Chan, Parks and Gillilan submitted a proposal for the installation to the newly formed Art in Library Spaces Committee, whose mission is “to create inclusive artistic spaces for University staff, faculty, and students as well as members of the Charlottesville community.” The committee includes members from not only the Library, but the Fralin Museum, the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, UVA Arts and the School of Architecture, as well as members of the Charlottesville arts community. The “Double Happiness” proposal was the first one accepted by the committee. “Double Happiness” was also sponsored by UVA Arts and the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts.

“We’re delighted that Professor Chan’s piece kicks off this important initiative and glad to have been connected to her work through Library staff committed to making student voices heard,” said Catalina Piatt-Esguerra, the Library’s Associate Dean for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity & Accessibility and Chair of the Art in Library Spaces Committee. “We hope that Art in Library Spaces continues to explore the ways visual display can contribute to inclusive space-making in Shannon Library.”

Ahead of the reception celebration, we spoke with Chan, Parks, and Gillilan, about “Double Happiness” and the experience of bringing a student idea to life. Our discussion is below.

Q. Can you walk me through the process of this art installation? How were the phrases chosen?

Chan: This piece was initiated by Haley and Cecelia, who conducted a focus group with APISAA students in which there was a clear desire to have more representation in public spaces. Representing the Asian American community has always been important to me, and I enjoy the new audiences that public projects allow my work to reach.

For this piece I reached out to numerous student organizations that serve the APISAA population at UVA with a call for sayings, colloquial phrases, or greetings that are important in their language of origin. I received some wonderful submissions and edited them down to eight, representing a range of languages. I chose phrases that were poetic, funny, and universal, in the hopes of connecting with the viewer’s own experience. My original intention was to combine imagery with the text, but I decided to let the text stand on its own.

Four colorful banners hang against a white wall. They read: Ganbare, Japanese, to persevere; Double Happiness, Chinese, joy and unity; Hwaiting, Korean, you got this!; Padayon, Visayan dialect / Philippines, to carry on
To create “Double Happiness,” Chan reached out to numerous student organizations that serve the APISAA population at UVA with a call for sayings, colloquial phrases, or greetings that are important in their language of origin.

Q. How did you decide which banners would be in English and which would be in the original languages?

Chan: This was an artistic decision. There are six panels with phonetic spellings or the original language, and two panels translated into English. The two I chose to translate stood out as the most poetic and moving. They are “double happiness” from Chinese, and “all places are ours and all people are our kin” from Tamil. I wanted the majority English speaking visitors to be able to engage with the spirit of these sentiments from afar and be drawn in to investigate the piece more fully. The six phonetic panels are phrases that represent more casual conversation.

I was also wary of having the piece look like one of those airport signs that translate the word “welcome” into many languages. It is important to me that the viewer can recognize the more expressive tone of the piece.

Q. What are the materials you used in creating the installation? And can you talk about your color choices and font choices?

Chan: The piece is digitally printed vinyl, constructed into eight scrolls. The installation format mimics the Chinese tradition of hanging scrolls in an interior space.

I love color and am influenced by the boldness of 1980s and ’90s popular culture. I am always exploring the edges of color harmony in my painting and that palette translates to what I’ve done here. Likewise, the bubble-like font offers a bit of humor to the piece, which is important in my work.

Q. What are some of your favorite pieces in the exhibition?

Parks: I don’t have a singular favorite piece. I love how bright and colorful and modern the panels are, and I love how they fit perfectly into the space. I love seeing how people react to it when they see it for the first time. Amy did an incredible job.

Gillilan: It’s also hard to say what my favorite piece in the exhibition is, because I think what makes it so gorgeous is how all the colorful panels fit together. I am a little partial to the Japanese phrase, “ganbare,” because I have Japanese heritage. Sending a picture of the piece to my Japanese American mother was a really special moment. I’m hoping she can see it in person soon! I agree with Cecelia, it has been so emotionally resonant to watch people walk onto the second floor of the library and stop in their tracks to observe the art. 

Four colorful banners hang against a white white. They read: Kya baat hai, Hindi, how amazing!; All places are ours and all people are our kin, Tamil; Andamu, Telugu, inner beauty; Sudah makan, Malaysian, have you eaten?
There are six panels in “Double Happiness” with phonetic spellings or the original language, and two panels translated into English. “The two I chose to translate stood out as the most poetic and moving,” Chan said.

Q. What would you most like visitors to know about this installation?

Chan: “Double Happiness” is a celebration of the joy we find through connection, and a reminder of home that we share with the UVA community. I am very grateful for to all the wonderful people at the Library who have helped me create this piece.

Q. Anything else you’d like to add?

Gillilan: Working with Amy has been a privilege. I love that we were able to include an artist in the UVA community for this project. It’s also been incredibly meaningful to bring a student idea to life. The students we worked with were so perceptive and passionate. It was a formative experience to hear their feedback, and to work to incorporate their perspective into remarkable change in our library space. 

Participants selected for 2024 Archives Leadership Institute at the University of Virginia

By UVA Library | Fri, 04/05/2024 - 10:12

In a competitive application process, 25 archivists have been selected as participants in the 2024 Archives Leadership Institute (ALI).

ALI is a grant program funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. The ALI will be hosted at the University of Virginia for the years 2024-2026, and will provide advanced training for 25 archivists and memory workers, giving them the knowledge and tools to transform the archival profession in theory, practice, stewardship, and care. In support of the project, the University of Virginia Library was awarded $300,000 by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the granting agency of the National Archives and Records Administration.  

Participants were selected for the 2024 ALI@Virginia program based on their exceptional skills and potential, their ability to influence change within the archival field, a strong commitment to the archival profession, demonstrated professional organizational involvement and service, a collaborative and innovative spirit, and representation and/or support of diversity within the profession.

The Archives Leadership Institute held at the University of Virginia is a weeklong immersion program that embraces a distraction-free, focused opportunity for archival leaders to develop necessary theories, skills, and knowledge. Participants will engage in classroom and experiential learning focusing on individual growth, building capacity as a leader, organizational leadership, and responsible stewardship and partnerships. The ALI@Virginia experience will be grounded in context and place. Thus, the cohort will explore leadership through the lens of the unique emotional and historical landscape that the University of Virginia offers.

“We’re grateful to the NHPRC to have this opportunity in the UVA Library to build on the ALI traditions of an intensive, immersive, interactive, and inspiring leadership experience,” said Associate University Librarian for Special Collections Brenda Gunn, who is the director of the Institute. “Our faculty will bring a wealth of experience to our core topics of Self Knowledge and Individual Growth, Organizational Leadership, and Responsible Stewardship and Partnerships.”

“In building this iteration of ALI, the fifth one since 2008, the steering committee envisioned welcoming memory workers who have an appetite for moving our professions forward, who want to be responsible to their communities, and who desire to lead their organizations with empathy and compassion.” 

Archives Leadership Institute 2024 cohort

  • Amber L. Moore, Atlanta University Center
  • Andrea Battleground, Archives for Film at Lincoln Center
  • Arnetta Girardeau, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
  • Beaudry Rae Allen, Villanova University
  • Betts Coup, Harvard University
  • Brittany Newberry, Georgia State University
  • Chianta Dorsey, Chicago Public Library
  • David Castillo, National Archives and Records Administration
  • Elisabeth B. Seelinger, United States Senate
  • Emily Jones, Gates Archive
  • Isaac Fellman, GLBT Historical Society
  • J.E. Molly Seegers, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital
  • Jaimi Parker, Tarrant County (TX) Office of Historic Preservation and Archives
  • Jessica L. Webster, Baruch College, City University of New York
  • Joy Novak, Washington University
  • LaToya Devezin, National Archives and Records Administration
  • Laurel McPhee, University of California, San Diego
  • Lisa Nguyen, University of California, San Francisco
  • Liza Posas, Lucas Museum of Narrative Art
  • Lolita Rowe, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Rachel Winston, University of Texas at Austin
  • Samantha Bradbeer Stephens, Hallmark Cards, Inc.
  • Samantha Crisp, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
  • Sandy Rodriguez, University of Missouri-Kansas City
  • Selena Ortega-Chiolero, Chickaloon Village Traditional Council

Read full participant biographies or learn more about the Archives Leadership Institute on the ALI website, www.archivesleadershipinstitute.org.

Join us for the grand opening!

By UVA Library | Tue, 04/02/2024 - 12:42

All are welcome to join on Thursday, April 4 for a grand opening celebration of The Edgar Shannon Library

Welcome to Edgar Shannon Library


An open house, with activities from various Library areas and departments, will take place from noon to 4 p.m. Activities will include interactive demonstrations, special displays of Library collections, virtual reality, and more!

A bright, open space shows a balcony overlooking a lower floor. Both spaces are full of book shelves and natural light.Remarks will begin at 4 p.m., and speakers include University Librarian John Unsworth; UVA President Jim Ryan; State Senator Creigh Deeds; Vice Rector Carlos Brown; Professor Larry Sabato; Professor Emeritus Jerome McGann; and Lois Shannon, of the Edgar Shannon family.

Everyone is welcome to stay for a reception afterwards in the Z Society Reading Room on the second floor.

Events throughout the day include:

More events are still being added! See the full schedule, or learn more about the beautiful Edgar Shannon Library. We hope to see you on April 4!

An in-depth look at the new library

By Jeff Hill | Wed, 03/27/2024 - 14:05

After being closed for nearly four years, Alderman Library — now The Edgar Shannon Library — reopened in early January, with 100,000 square feet of renovated space and 130,000 square feet of new construction replacing the previous stacks towers. Now that the semester is well underway, the library is already experiencing heavy traffic as users explore and enjoy the new building (check out this Cavalier Daily article for the student point of view). Photographer Tom Daly captured a few of the spaces on and just prior to opening day. In advance of our grand opening celebration on April 4, enjoy this photo essay of the renovated library!

A group of people walking out of a vestibule and pouring into a large room. The room has light fixtures on long chains hanging from very high ceilings, and black and white checkered floors.
Although the library opened before the regular semester began, there was still a small crowd waiting to be let in. Promptly at 9 a.m. the doors automatically unlocked, and the group poured in through the vestibule.
Wide lens view showing a huge room with light fixtures on long chains hanging from a high ceiling, black and white checkered floors, and a variety of seating options.
Memorial Hall, the main lobby on the south side of the building, has been completely refurbished. In addition to the three new doors and vestibule, there’s a much larger Service & Information Desk and a variety of seating with room for flexibility. The checkered flooring the room originally sported when it opened in 1938 is back — but now made of sustainable tile with acoustic advantages.
Long view looking down a reading room with black and white checkered floors and wooden chairs accompanying long wooden tables with 2 lamps on each table.
The Reference, Periodicals, and Oversize Room retains an old-school reading room flavor. The ceilings have been raised and the walls have been painted a warm yellow which, along with the windows lining the east wall, give the room a lighter feel than it previously enjoyed. Much of the furniture in this room was refurbished by the same company that built it more than 85 years ago, Virginia Craftsmen of Harrisonburg.
A student taking a photograph in a brightly lit library space with shelving and a row of wooden tables and chairs.
Shannon Library features a clerestory — a raised section of the roof with windows — that allows natural light to flow down into the fifth and fourth floors. This area on the fourth floor beneath the clerestory has proven to be a popular place to take photos.
People, some seated, some walking, in a brightly lit library with shelving, multiple windows, and an aperture in the floor surrounded by a railing.
The fifth floor stacks area beneath the clerestory features an aperture in the floor surrounded by a railing. The cast iron panel in the center of the photo was one of many once in the Rotunda — they lined the Dome Room gallery. The windows in the clerestory, as well as other windows in the building, are now treated with UV protection on the glass so collections won’t be damaged by the natural light.
An open seating space in a library with wooden tables and chairs, as well as armchairs and low coffee-table style tables.
This is the building’s fifth floor, but this open central area is mirrored on the other four floors as well (but not the basement, which doesn’t contain public areas). The spaces mostly contain a mixture of seating types, and there’s easy access to elevators and stairs. The setup also allows Library staff the flexibility to see how the space is being used and modify accordingly once the building has been “lived in” for a while.
A person wearing a backpack and carrying a tote bag squats, reading, in front of a shelf of books in a library.
Shelving on the library’s fifth floor. Shannon Library, along with stacks on the first floor of Clemons, holds the University’s social sciences and humanities collection. The books, moved out of the building for the duration of the renovation (mostly to Ivy Stacks), are moving back in over the course of the spring 2024 semester.
A reading room in a library with parquet-style floors and a double-height ceiling. Shelving can be seen in the background and seating on the floor above behind a railing looks down into the room.
The north end of the new construction has large reading rooms on the second, third, and fourth floors. This is the fourth floor reading room, which features a high ceiling with double-height windows, and looks up to seating on the floor above.
2 area rugs with tables and soft seating on each rug create 2 separate sitting areas in a large room. The room has a fireplace, large windows, chandeliers, and shelving on either side of the fireplace.
Prior to the renovation, this comfortable third floor space was most recently the Current Journals Room. With journals and periodicals moving to the fourth floor, the shelving was removed and replaced with soft seating and tables and the room was reimagined as the Graduate Student Lounge. The space also features a kitchenette and lockers, and is exclusively for the use of UVA graduate students and their guests.
View down an aisle between two rows of compact or mobile shelving, with handles on the end of each range of shelving.
Stacks on Shannon's first and third floors feature compact mobile shelving. The shelving units are fitted with wheeled traction systems and are easily moved with rotary handles, allowing for more books to be held in the same footprint than with traditional shelving.
View in the interior of a building looking down several floors from the center of a stairway with landings at right angles to the steps.
In addition to stairs on the northeast, northwest, southeast, and southwest of the building, there is also a large central staircase. Bright, open, and easy-to-use, the staircase greatly improves the flow of people within the building and represents a huge improvement from the “submarine stairs” in the stacks pre-renovation, which were dimly lit, featured heavy swinging doors, and were so narrow users had to wait at the landings or turn sideways to pass each other going up and down.
A wall painted a honey mustard yellow with two stainless steel elevator doors side by side.
Two elevators side by side may not look like much, but like the central staircase they greatly improve mobility as thousands of people per day use the building. These are in the center of the building opposite the staircase, and there’s another elevator on the north end allowing visitors coming in from the second floor entrances to easily travel up and down.
A person walks through an interior tunnel connecting two buildings. A sign in the foreground says “Connector to Alderman Library this way.”
In addition to movement within the building, there’s also a vast improvement of movement between buildings, as a new internal passageway connects directly with Clemons Library. Library materials can also move back and forth — they’ll just need to be checked out before users take them outdoors.
A row of books on a shelf showing the spines, of various colors/ages/designs and in various states of disrepair.
A row of books awaiting repair in the Preservation Services department. Preservation Services has all-new labs in the building for the conservation of books, manuscripts, maps, and other printed matter, as well as audiovisual material and digital media.
A large bright classroom full of students sitting at tables while a person stands at a lectern in front of a screen. On the lectern is a “UVA Library” logo.
The new library has a large “Seminar Room” on the east side of the building, looking out towards the Chapel. On opening day, it was already in use as Teaching and Learning Librarian Todd Burks hosted a group of high school students from Tandem Friends School in Charlottesville, to introduce them to using college-level resources for a research assignment.
A large but cozy-looking wood paneled room with people sitting in soft seating. The room also has bookshelves, tables, and a fireplace.
The much-loved McGregor Room has been refurbished but maintains its cozy feel. Originally built in 1939 to house the Tracy W. McGregor Library of American History, it grew to hold the library’s special collections, and became a general reading room when those materials moved to the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library in 2004. 
A room with shelving and mid-century modern chairs and tables. At the end of a room a person sits in a chair in front of a pair of windows between two very large yellow vases.
Formerly the Asian Studies Room, this elegant space in the building’s east wing was dedicated as the Stanley and Lucie Weinstein Buddhist and Asian Studies Library in 2019, after a bequest from the Weinsteins made UVA a major holder of materials in that field. Books will fill the shelves by the midpoint of the spring 2024 semester. The large vases flanking the windows are from the Library’s Fine and Decorative Arts Collection.
Archival boxes line shelves in a bright white room. On the wall hangs a poster that says “Flowerdew Hundred: A day in the country lasts 400 years” and shows drawings of a windmill with a colonial-era person leading a horse, people wearing shorts and t-shirts excavating an archaeological site, and artifacts such as pottery and pipes.
Shannon Library's basement includes closed collections spaces, including the Flowerdew Hundred Collections Lab, which is open to students, researchers, and visitors by appointment. Flowerdew Hundred, on the James River, was at various times the site of Native American villages, a frontier settlement, a plantation, and a Civil War encampment. The archaeological collections from the site were donated to the UVA Library and the space is used to preserve, catalog, and study the artifacts and make them accessible for research.
A courtyard showing brick walls and a mixture of wooden tables and chairs and soft seating, under a skylight.
The building’s original design included two light wells meant to afford light and ventilation, but prior to the renovation the floor of the light courts was open to the elements and closed to visitors. These have been redesigned and are now two second-floor study courts under skylights. With seating for dozens, the courts have already become popular places for reading, study, and light socializing.
A row of card catalog drawers line the left side of a hallway, which is broken by an opening. At the end of the hallway are two doors, and the space is lighted by fixtures hanging from the ceiling down its length.
Opposite and on either side of the second-floor Service & Information Desk are rows of card catalog drawer faces, a nod to the building’s past. They will become a donor wall, listing the names of major donors to the renovation project, and/or those who donors chose to give in honor or in memory of.
A blue flag with a University of Virginia logo attached to a pole is in the foreground of a photo showing a multiple-story brick building with white pilasters between large arched windows, many smaller windows, and stairs leading up to terrace space.
A UVA flag flies outside the second floor north entrance to the building. With two doors on opposite sides of a large terrace connecting to a portico on the west, this new entry just yards from University Avenue affords an open, welcoming approach to the library and Central Grounds.